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Adequate folate levels linked to lower cardiovascular mortality risk in rheumatoid arthritis patients

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are 60% more likely to die from cardiovascular disease. Photo by Getty Images.

February 26, 2020

Decreased folate levels in the bloodstream have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, shedding light on why those patients are more susceptible to heart and vascular disease, according to research published today in JAMA Network Open by experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).



Study finds vaping prevention program significantly reduces use in middle school students

Middle school students in a group learning session. Photo by Getty Images.

January 29, 2020

In response to the youth vaping crisis, experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) developed CATCH My Breath, a program to prevent electronic cigarette use among fifth – 12th grade students. Research published in Public Health Reports reveals the program significantly reduces the likelihood of e-cigarette use among students who complete the curriculum.


Children to bear the burden of negative health effects from climate change

Photo of flooding in Texas. Photo by Getty Images.

January 27, 2020

The grim effects that climate change will have on pediatric health outcomes was the focus of a “Viewpoint” article published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation by Susan E. Pacheco, MD, an expert at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).





Researchers awarded $3.1 million to address vaping epidemic among youth

E-cigarettes have become the most commonly used tobacco product by U.S. adolescents.

December 17, 2019

As e-cigarette use by young people reaches epidemic proportions, researchers at UTHealth have received a $3.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to conduct the first-ever assessment on the long-term results of a nationwide nicotine vaping prevention program for youth called CATCH My Breath.




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